Minjie

Meet Josh Darr

Meet Josh Darr

Joshua Darr will join the Manship School of Mass Communication in fall 2015 as an assistant professor of political communication. He will earn his Ph.D. in May from the University of Pennsylvania. He also obtained a master’s in political science with an emphasis on American Politics, political communication and methodology at Penn, and a bachelor’s degree in political science from Boston College. His research focuses on the placement and effects of campaign field offices, the importance of local newspapers for voter learning and political awareness, and the ability of campaigns to influence the quantity and tone of their local media coverage.   1. a. Can you tell me a little more about your research (specific areas or issues you’re concerned with)? I study the media and voter outreach strategies of electoral campaigns and their effects on voters. My research has examined the placement and effects of campaign field offices, the importance of local newspapers for voter learning and political awareness, and campaigns’ ability to influence the quantity and tone of their local media coverage. b. What drew you to this sort of research? I became interested in politics and elections during college while volunteering on campaigns. I am drawn to studying campaigns and political media because the interactive dynamics between journalists, campaigns, and voters are constantly changing. Each election presents an opportunity to study the impact of new campaign tactics and media sources. c. What practical and scholarly impact do you foresee your research having in political communication? I hope that my research encourages campaigns to invest in voter contact operations in neighborhoods and communities. I also hope to contribute to the ongoing discussion about a sustainable model for local political journalism, which is crucial for campaigns and voters alike in elections.   2. Are you currently working on any research projects? If so, can you tell me a little about it/them? I am currently looking at the impact of candidate appearances on local news production and voter learning. My dissertation makes a case for the continued importance of local political journalism to campaigns and voters in elections, despite the recent struggles of local news sources. I expect to continue conducting research on this subject for the next few years.   3. What drew you to the LSU Manship School for your first full-time faculty position post-graduation? What most excites you about this position? The opportunity to teach political communication...

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Manship at ICA 2015

Manship at ICA 2015

Manship Scholars Prepare to Present at ICA Conference BATON ROUGE, La. – Manship School faculty, graduate students and alumni are gearing up to leave their mark on the 65th Annual International Communication Association (ICA) Conference May 21-25 in San Juan, Puerto Rico. With 13 presentations and 14 presenters, this is the most number of presentations Manship scholars have given at an ICA Conference.   Themed “Communication Across the Life Span,” the 2015 ICA Conference urges researchers to investigate how the communication discipline offers a framework for interpreting the changing meanings, relationships, experiences, and significant crossroads of the life course. Keeping with this theme, Manship scholars will present on a variety of issues concerning technological evolution, diversity issues in mass media, social and environmental communication, and public relations and political communication.   Of the 12 submitted manuscripts, three received top paper distinctions from various divisions.   The faculty-student research team of professor Amy Reynolds and doctoral candidates Zeynep Altinay and Paige Brown Jarreau also received a top paper award from the Environmental Communication Division for their paper, “Best Practices in Environmental Communication: A Case Study of Louisiana’s Coastal Crisis.” Doctoral students Myoung-Gi Chon and Young Kim received individual best student paper honors from the Public Relations Division for their papers, “Toward a Model of Government-Public Relationships with Digital Publics in Crisis,” and “Understanding Publics’ Perception and Behaviors in Crisis Communication: Effects of Crisis News Framing and Publics’ Acquisition, Selection and Transmission of Information in Crisis Situations.”   Associate professor Meghan S. Sanders and professor Brooke Barnett (Elon University) will host a BlueSky professional development seminar titled “Teaching and Working Across the Generations.” The session will examine communication across the life span by bringing together scholars from various career stages to discuss teaching and research, with the goal of establishing relationships and possible collaborations across generational lines, work styles and identities. Participants from all disciplines within communications, and all career stages – graduate students to senior scholars– are welcome to attend.   A complete list of ICA 2015 presentations and sessions from current Manship faculty and graduate students is below. Andrea Miller, Myoung-Gi Chon, Young Kim “Do Media Really Make Us Silent?: Exploring the Fear of Isolation and Situational Variables as Mediators in the Digital Media Environment” Session: Advances in Public Opinion Research   Andrea Miller, Young Kim, Myoung-Gi Chon “How Does the News Affect Me? Understanding Third-Person Effect by Different Framing...

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Real-time LA Debate Study

Real-time LA Debate Study

The Louisiana Senate debates on Oct. 14 and Oct. 29 presented a prime research opportunity to analyze participants’ emotional responses to political stimuli for Kathleen Searles and Martin Johnson, two of the LSU Manship School’s newest faculty members. Searles, who holds a joint appointment as an assistant professor in Mass Communication and Political Science, and Johnson, the Kevin P. Reilly, Sr. Chair in Political Communication and Professor of Mass Communication and Political Science, merged their interest in politics and media to critically compare instruments used in real-time response measurement (RTR) and physiological measurement. RTR measurement is an approach that provides an intuitive glimpse of an audience’s response to specific moments in a message or stimulus, such as an advertisement or a debate, using a device like a handheld dial. Searles and Johnson used sophisticated equipment from the LSU Media Effects Lab (MEL) to compare participants’ emotional responses to the debates captured by two different instruments: a handheld response dial device, or a perception analyzer, which relies on RTR, and external psychophysiological hardware to measure sympathetic emotional reactions via skin conductance. On each occasion, about 60 LSU student participants watched candidates Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., Rep. Bill Cassidy, R-La., and former Republican candidate Rob Maness in the highly publicized debates. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: RTR dials or skin conductance measures. “Depending on the sort of differences we find between the [skin conductance] and dial conditions, our results may have serious implications for researchers as well as CNN’s use of dials,” Searles said. “Moreover, if the pattern of emotional response differs significantly between the two conditions, our results will have implications for scholarly measurement of political emotion.” Searles said the MEL has been central to the success of their project. The MEL provided access to the appropriate devices and a space to conduct trial runs in the weeks prior to the debate. The MEL’s staff members trained Searles and Johnson on the sophisticated instruments and helped them set up and troubleshoot technological issues at the Oct. 14 debate. Participants were secured through the MEL Subject Pool, which comprises LSU undergraduate students who volunteer to participate in various research studies. “We are confident that this research will contribute to communication and political research broadly, but none of this would have been possible without the MEL,” Searles said. While data analysis of Searles and Johnson’s experiment is currently...

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PCRG Mini-Conference

PCRG Mini-Conference

Student members of the Political Communication Research Group (PCRG) had the opportunity to share and receive feedback on their work from a leading scholar in the field, and brainstorm on new ideas, methods and applications of their work at Political Communication Research Group 2014 Mini-Conference on Friday, November 14. Sponsored by the Don Owens Professorship, this mini-conference was the first Manship research forum organized by students. Students shared their summer work from externships and conferences, courses and previous PCRG collaborative efforts. The mini-conference also featured a top visiting scholar whose work influenced PCRG.   Brendan Nyhan, assistant professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College, delivered a keynote speech on “Research and Misperceptions.” Nyhan, a contributor to The Upshot at The New York Times and former media critic for Columbia Journalism Review, also met with the group to discuss its works in progress.   “Both the faculty and the students in the Political Communication Research Group felt lucky to be able to bring Brendan Nyhan to campus,” said Rosanne Scholl, assistant professor. “He helped us think about how our research on what journalists can do to increase public understanding (and decrease misunderstanding) fits in with the big picture of policy and democracy, as well as with his own groundbreaking work on this topic. He was very generous with creative ideas and also advice about technical methods.”   In addition to the keynote address, the mini-conference also featured presentations by political communication faculty and students. Members of the group include undergraduate students Lindsey Spillman and Jacob Irving; doctoral students Newly Paul and Mingxiao Sui; and professors Ray Pingree, Rosanne Scholl, Johanna Dunaway, Martin Johnson and Katie Searles. Also presenting at the mini-conference were doctoral students Paige Brown Jarreau and Myounng-Gi Chon. The Political Communication Research Group is a collaborative research group producing research on the role of news media in assisting an informed electorate to make good decisions as citizens of a democracy. It is one of five research groups within the Manship School designed to provide graduate and undergraduate students with the opportunity to gain experience in their specified field of study. The other research groups focus on elections, digital advertising, crisis communications and media effects/media psychology. Students learn hands-on research skills such as coding, website/project management, website design, database searches and analytical writing. By working with Manship faculty, students can make intellectual contributions to the media industries...

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Manship at NCA

Manship at NCA

BY Britney C. Little Baton Rouge, La. (Nov. 17, 2014) — Six research papers examining a range of communication topics will be presented by Manship School of Mass Communication faculty, graduate students and alumni at the 100th Annual National Communication Association Convention, Nov. 20-23 in Chicago, IL.   Manship School faculty and graduate students seek to make intellectual contributions by conducting cutting-edge research focused on the many aspects of mass communication and its multifaceted relationships with society.  The National Communication Association has been promoting the priorities and interests of communications scholars, researchers and professionals since 1914.   A schedule of Manship School convention participants is listed below. To view the entire schedule of convention events, visit the 100th National Communication Association Convention Online Program. For more information regarding the National Communication Association, visit www.natcom.org.       SCHEDULE   Thursday, November 20   8:00 a.m. to 9:15 a.m. Jensen Moore, Louisiana State University; Sara Magee, Loyola University Maryland; Ellada Gamreklidze, Louisiana State University: “Grieving Amid Presence of our Past(s): How Communication Technologies are Transforming and Sometimes Challenging the Grieving Process” (Hilton Chicago – Room: Williford A – Third Floor)   Young Kim, Louisiana State University: “Transforming an Effective Government-Public Relationship Based on a Synthetic Approach to Public Segmentation” (Hilton Chicago – Room: 4M – Fourth Floor)   2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Young Kim, Louisiana State University: “Priming Partisan Effects of the 2012 Presidential Election News Coverage” (Hilton Chicago – Room: Boulevard Room A – Second Floor)   Saturday, November 22   2:00 p.m. to 3:15 p.m. Ellada Gamreklidze, Louisiana State University: “Freedom of Speech in U.S. Supreme Court Justices’ Opinions: Political Speech Protection as Applied by the Roberts Court” (Freedom of Expression Top Papers Panel) (Hilton Chicago – Room: 4F – Fourth Floor)   3:30 p.m. to 4:45 p.m. Myounggi Chon, Louisiana State University: “The Effects of Social Media on the Swing Voter in 2012 Korean Presidential Election” (Palmer House Hilton – Room: Salon 2 – Third Floor)   A-Reum Jung, Louisiana State University; Ah-Ram Lee, University of Alabama: “Our View vs. Their View: A Content Analysis of Asian American Portrayals in Magazines” (Hilton Chicago – Room: 4B – Fourth...

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