MEL Notes Blog

This is the marketplace for idea exchange on Media Effects. We will update the blog posts using pieces students write for the Media Effects course.

The Effects of Inspirational Media – Phase Three

How to Sign Up for “The Effects of Inspirational Media – Phase Three” First, please log into the MEL Research Participation System to determine whether you have already participated in phase one of this study during Fall 2016. If you participated in “The Effects of Inspirational Media – Phase One,” you are ineligible to participate in the third phase of this research project. Next, if you are in MC 2000 (Section 1) or MC 3333 (Section 1), please recall whether you participated in “The Effects of Inspirational Media – Phase Two” during Spring 2017 via an online survey link. If you participated in phase two of this study, you are ineligible to participate in the third phase of this research project. If you did not complete either of the aforementioned phases of this study, you are eligible to participate in phase three, which will take place in the Media Effects Lab. Students interested in participating in this study should sign up for one 30-minute lab session during the researcher’s brief class presentations. Students absent from class during the brief presentations should email Kaelen Delaune (kdelau5@lsu.edu) if they are interesting in signing up to participate in the research project. Please reference the date and time you wish to sign up for. Below are the dates and times for all study sessions: Monday, March 27 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m. Tuesday, March 28 1:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 29 9 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m. 3 p.m. Thursday, March 30 12:30 p.m. 1 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. Friday, March 31 9 a.m. 9:30 a.m. 10 a.m. 10:30 a.m. 11 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 12 p.m. 12:30 p.m. 1 p.m. 1:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 3...

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The Anatomy of Inspiring Media

Instructions for Signing Up for the Anatomy of Inspiring Media   First, please log into the MEL System to determine if you have already participated in Parts 1 and 2 of “The Anatomy of Inspiring Media.”  There are multiple studies being conducted on inspiring media, so please be sure you are looking for the right study. If you participated in Part 1 (the online survey) AND Part 2 (lab session) in fall 2016, you are not eligible to participate again. If you participated in Part 1 only, you are still eligible to participate in Part 2. Simply attend the 30-minute lab session you signed up for during class. If you did not complete either part of the study in fall 2016, please complete Part 1 by clicking on this link. Once Part 1 is completed, please attend the 30-minute lab session you signed up for during class. You MUST complete the online survey prior to attending the lab session.  All lab sessions take place in the Media Effects Lab. You MUST complete Parts 1 and 2 in order to receive course credit.  Partial credit will not be awarded. You will need your 5-digit MEL ID, if you already have one. If you do not have a MEL ID,  when asked for one provide a 5-digit ID number of your choice.  Please remember this number as you will be asked to provide it for both Parts 1 and 2. Questions can be directed to Dr. Meghan Sanders...

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Ahh, Do I HAVE to Say Goodbye??

As the saying goes, breaking up is hard to do. Not only are we finding ourselves breaking up with friends, teachers, and romantic partners, we also find ourselves having to “break up” our favorite television characters. As if there wasn’t enough problems in this world. It seems like the inevitable fate. Just as you are really starting to like a show or connect with a character, the show is cancelled or the actor is off the show to do bigger and better things (how selfish of that actor, right?).

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It’s Complicated: Breakups with Mediated Characters

It’s Complicated: Breakups with Mediated Characters

Parasocial breakups (PSBs) occur after an audience member’s favorite character—with whom they have developed a PSR with—goes off the air. The researchers completed this study right after the final episode of Friends aired to explore the effects of a “breakup” with participants’ favorite character on the show. I would imagine that breaking up with a whole group would have different effects than just losing one friend. Also, another study should examine the effects of PSBs right after binge watching a show on Netflix, Hulu, etc. to see if similar effects are found. Finally, I would like to see a study that compares a parasocial break up to a parasocial break.

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MEL Notes: Parasocial Contact

MEL Notes:  Parasocial Contact

The week of February 29, the class discussion revolved around various forms of audience involvement, the psychological response a person has to mediated messages. From identification to fandom to worship, media viewers/consumers can engage with content and narratives to varying degrees through their connections with the individuals (media personae) featured.

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In a Parasocial World

In a Parasocial World

Research has found that ‘narrative’ versus ‘analytical’ processing of an ad message leads to greater positive attitudes toward the ad through self-transportation (Escalas 2007). Furthermore, greater transportation has also been found to increase the perceived realism of narratives and character liking (Green, 2004; Green and Brock, 2000; Krakowiak and Oliver 2009). Research has also demonstrated that when an individual is exposed to information that is incongruent with his/her own attitude, there will be greater positive changes in attitudes toward the object of the ad due to more elaborate processing (Sen and Lernan 2007). Research has also demonstrated that when an individual is exposed to information that is incongruent with his/her own attitude, there will be greater positive changes in attitudes toward the object of the ad due to more elaborate processing (Sen and Lernan 2007). Thus, one may expect that by framing the message in a way that is incongruent to the surrounding stereotypical norms (like that ‘Imagine a Word’ ad), greater changes in attitude will result.

This made me wonder…

When a majority group member is exposed to ad concerning a minority-group related issue, similar to the one shown in this blog post, will the message frame moderate the ad exposure effect on prejudices? And what explains these effects (i.e., involvement, transportation, parasocial contact?

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