News

Use of Occupy Wall Street Grievances by MSNBC and Fox News

Student Researchers: Liz Lebrón, Ellada Gamreklidze, Jonathan Ferrante and Kristi Barnett Williams

Faculty Supervisor: Meghan Sanders

For a Complete Report of this Research, See: Lebrón, L., Gamreklidze, E., Ferrante, J., & Williams, K. B. (2011). Use of occupy wall street grievances by MSNBC and Fox News. This paper was based on a project as part of “the Introduction to Research Method in Mass Communication” graduate course .

Abstract:

Media coverage of dissident protest movements is historically dominated by spectacle. Thematic, issues-based coverage is eschewed in favor of reactive, episodic stories featuring eccentric participants that are seldom representative of the movement.  While digital media provide dissident groups alternative outlets to communicate their grievances, the extent to which their messages penetrate traditional media remains unclear.  This content analysis contributes to the literature of media coverage of dissident protest movements by analyzing framing of Occupy Wall Street (OWS) on Fox News and MSNBC following the release of the group’s Declaration on the Occupation of New York City on their website.  The findings reveal that both stations primarily used traditional dissident movement frames when reporting on Occupy Wall Street.

The Role of Race in Television News Coverage of Shortcomings in U.S. Secondary Education

Student Researcher: Jasmine Elise Haynes

Faculty Supervisor: Jasmine McNealy

For a Complete Report of this Research, See: Haynes, J. (2010). The Role of Race in Television News Coverage of Shortcomings in U.S. Secondary Education. This is the author’s thesis.

Abstract: Scholars and news media alike acknowledge that one of the main problems in education today is the minority achievement gaps in national testing. Although many education scholars have compiled several in-depth reasons as to why minorities, particularly African-American students, seem to generally lag behind their white counterparts, television news fails to give it’s audiences a comprehensive view of why minority achievement gaps are so prevalent in United States secondary public education. The purpose of this study was to examine where news consumers perceive television news places blame for problems in public education with regards to race. Studying how people perceive where television news places blame for minority gaps in academic achievement will build on the arguments of previous research that minorities are underrepresented as victims of social and political problems.

Through a descriptive online survey of quantitative responses, this study assesses respondents’ political affiliations and perspectives, their views on race, racial achievement gaps and television news coverage of those gaps. This study will discuss some of the major research on why African-Americans and other minorities struggle with academic achievement more than Whites and how television news rarely, if ever, covers these issues nor provide context to stories on African-Americans and education.

Application of Counter-Stereotype Strategy for National Image Management: A Comparative Study of U.S. and South Korean College Students’ National Stereotypes of China

Student Researcher: HyunMee Kang (PhD)

Faculty Supervisor: Richard Nelson

For a Complete Report of this Research, See: Kang, H. (2010). Application of Counter-Stereotype Strategy for National Image Management: A Comparative Study of U.S. and South Korean College Students’ National Stereotypes of China. This is the author’s dissertation.

Abstract: The study sought to explore the applicability of national stereotypes for implicit stereotype by measuring reaction times (RTs). Also, the study intended to suggest a more effective national image management in overseas practices by demonstrating the effect of counter-stereotype strategy on country-of-origin (COO) effect. A focus of the study was on China and Chinese people for national stereotypes and Chinese corporations and products made in China for the COO effect, considering unfavorable national images of China in news media and negative impressions on products made in China. The study compared national stereotypes of China and Chinese people and COO effect of Chinese corporations and products made in China with national stereotypes of Japan and Japanese people and Germany and German people and the COO effects of Japanese corporation and product made in Japan and German corporation and product made in Germany. Also, the study examined the comparison between U.S. and South Korean college students. The study employed two research methods, an experimental and online survey design.The results showed the potential that national stereotypes can be implicit by demonstrating a significant difference in subjects’ RTs. The difference in RTs between consistent and inconsistent attributes with countries’ existing national stereotypes can be inferred about the possibility that national stereotype can be implicit. The U.S. and South Korean participants reported more favorable perceptions of Japan and Japanese people than China and Chinese people and Germany and German people. The South Korean participants’ overall national stereotypes of the three countries were less favorable than the U.S. participants’. For the COO effect, the U.S. and South Korean participants also more favorably evaluated the Japanese corporation and its product than the two others, Chinese and German corporations and their products. Also, concerning the effect of counter-stereotype cues, the Chinese corporation with counter-stereotypical cues in the news story was more favorably evaluated than that of the other Chinese corporation without the cues.The study indicated the potential of applying national stereotypes for implicit stereotypes and utilizing counter-stereotype strategy in reducing unfavorable country images and suggested practical implications for overseas practitioners based on the findings.