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“Always On My Mind?”

“Always On My Mind?”

  About the Author: Hillary Akers is a second-year master’s student in the Manship School of Mass Communication. Her research interest is journalism schools and curriculum adaptation.   Overview of “Always On My Mind” In the journal article, “Always On My Mind: Exploring How Frequent, Recent, and Vivid Television Portrayals, Are Used in the Formation of Social Reality Judgments,” Dr. Karyn Riddle, associate professor in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, studied the effect of vividness, frequency, and recent exposure on social reality beliefs and accessibility using the heuristic processing model and cultivation theory as her theoretical foundation. The study found that vividness and frequency interacted to create a significant influence on social reality beliefs. Participants who were exposed to vivid images of violence in television programming, more frequently provided higher estimates of crime and violence in the world than those exposed to violence less frequently. The study yielded no findings supporting any influence on accessibility of constructs. Riddle (2010) also found that estimates of the prevalence of crime and immorality in the world were generally higher when participants were asked immediately following exposure to the violent programming, and tended to be lower after a 48-hour delay. Riddle (2010) concluded that views of social reality of heavier viewers of violent programming will, over time, be impacted. A future study that would possibly increase the internal validity of this study would be one that used full episodes of shows including violent behavior. Research on the connections that audiences make with television characters would be necessary in the literature review. This would add validity to the claim of the impact of vivid or non-vivid on-screen portrayals on viewers. The experiment would also more closely mirror reality in which viewers are exposed to an entire episode. The experimental design would keep the same 2x2x2 design. Also, post-questions about the viewers’ ability to relate to the character could be informative and beneficial to the study.   Themes, Binge Watching, and Media of the Future Riddle’s (2010) study contributes to a continuously growing body of work concerning the cultivation theory and heuristic processing model. As more and more television programming becomes available with consistent themes, such as violence, substance abuse, moral guidelines, etc., this body of work continues to be relevant to our culture. Also, the trend of “binge watching,” through media sources such as Hulu and Netflix,...

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MEL x PR Research

MEL x PR Research

LSU Manship School of Mass Communication offered brand new undergraduate Public Research Methods course (MC3020) last semester for the last time. This course emphasizes the importance of applied research in the PR industry.  Through this course, students would learn several applied PR research techniques, including secondary research, focus group, survey research, experimental design, and organic data analysis. Also, partnered with the Media Effect Lab, students in this course are able to get their hands dirty through actually conducting their own research projects in a timely manner. Basic research and analysis tool, such as SPSS, Qualtrics and Google Analytics, are also applied in this course. Listed below are some sample abstracts of the students’ group projects (Click on the group pictures to access to each project separately). For complete final project reports, please email msand@lsu.edu or mli16@lsu.edu.   University Recreation & Student Health Center: The Students Speak This research project is on how well the media being used by the University Recreation Center and Student Health Center is targeting the LSU students and ways to improve its media effects. The findings will help the facilities know how to get more people in the door.   The Knowledge of Human Trafficking in Baton Rouge This research was conducted to 1) determine what individuals know about human trafficking and the laws in place; 2) inform people in the Baton Rouge area of local human trafficking; 3) determine the facts or information that will provoke high levels of inspiration or support against human trafficking.   College Athletics: Pay, Crime, & Perceived Advantages This project taps into 1) how student athletes, students and the general public feel about college athletes being paid; 2) the public opinion of if athlete’s conduct off the field should affect how they are handled on the field; 3) whether individuals perceive/believe student athletes are treated differently from other students in the academic setting.   WeCycle: A Greener Outlook This project’s initial interest focused on sustainability, aiming at 1) understanding the awareness of the LSU community, specifically to gain insight on their knowledge of the services LSU recycling provides; 2) to gain awareness of the LSU community’s willingness to participate in further recycling efforts; 3) to gain an  perspective on ways to improve the LSU recycling system.   General Opinions From Women About Contraceptive Use The purpose of this research was to gain an overall opinion of contraception use among college-aged women.  This research utilized a...

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Reading Responsibly

Reading Responsibly

While warning messages are designed to provide consumers with important information for making decisions, they often don’t seem to work with young adults who tend to underestimate the risk of using hazardous products such as cigarettes and alcohol.

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